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dc.contributor.authorHernández-Gutiérrez, José Carlos
dc.contributor.authorPeña-Ramos, José Antonio
dc.contributor.authorEspinosa, Víctor I.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-22T13:58:40Z
dc.date.available2022-02-22T13:58:40Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-01
dc.identifier10.3390/w14030277
dc.identifier.issn20734441
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/9917
dc.description.abstractNon-violent methods can strongly support achieving the 2030 Agenda of sustainable development goals, increasing energy efficiency and access in the poorest countries. However, hydroelectric power stations are disputed strategic elements in any region of the world. This paper analyzes, firstly, the role of hydroelectric power stations as elements that have been generating conflicts in Latin America in the period 1982–2018 and, secondly, the conflicts themselves. The results show that indigenous peoples face the most significant risks from constructing dams and, consequently, they are the primary opponents of hydroelectric projects.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.subjectDevelopmentes_ES
dc.subjectEnergy productiones_ES
dc.subjectHydroelectric power stationses_ES
dc.subjectStrategyes_ES
dc.subjectSustainabilityes_ES
dc.subjectWater conflictses_ES
dc.titleHydro Power Plants as Disputed Infrastructures in Latin Americaes_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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