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dc.contributor.authorCruz-Martínez, Gibrán
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-03T18:40:12Z
dc.date.available2021-12-03T18:40:12Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier10.1080/08039410.2021.1998212
dc.identifier.issn08039410
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/9746
dc.description.abstractIs universal social assistance unaffordable? Targeting social policy has been praised as a magic solution to select the ‘deserving poor’ and efficiently use the scarce resources in the Global South. The article tests the unaffordability hypothesis using five counterfactual analyses based on expenditure redirection (military expenditure, energy subsidies, and the potential illegal/odious external debt servicing) and increasing tax revenues (income and trade tax) in up to thirty-three countries. The article shows the revenue-generating potential of taxes and reprioritising expenditures from unproductive to productive areas to finance–totally or partly- basic universal social pensions in large part of Latin America and the Caribbean; therefore, dispelling the unaffordability myth.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherRoutledgees_ES
dc.subjectcash transferses_ES
dc.subjectolder agees_ES
dc.subjectsocial assistancees_ES
dc.subjectsocial policyes_ES
dc.subjectsocial protectiones_ES
dc.subjecttargetinges_ES
dc.subjectwelfare statees_ES
dc.titleUniversal Social Pensions Are Unaffordable … Not! Testing the Unaffordability Hypothesis in Latin America and the Caribbeanes_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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