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dc.contributor.authorCavero-Redondo, Iván
dc.contributor.authorSaz-Lara, Alicia
dc.contributor.authorSequí-Domínguez, Irene
dc.contributor.authorGómez-Guijarro, Maria Dolores
dc.contributor.authorRuíz-Grao, Marta Carolina
dc.contributor.authorMartinez Vizcaino, Vicente J.
dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez-Bueno, Celia
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-15T03:55:30Z
dc.date.available2021-10-15T03:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.identifier10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2021.104085
dc.identifier.issn00207489
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/9624
dc.description.abstractBackground: Increasingly, health professionals and patients have begun to be involved in eHealth interventions to assist in the self-management of hypertension. Therefore, this study was aimed at comparing the effect of different types of eHealth interventions (phone calls, blood pressure telemonitoring, emails, web-site, smartphone-app, short message service (SMS) and more than two eHealth interventions) on reducing systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increasing adherence to medication treatment, improving physical activity compliance, controlling blood pressure, and improving quality of life (QoL). Methods: A systematic search in MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases was conducted to identify experimental studies addressing the effect of eHealth interventions on the self-management of hypertension. Comparative evaluation of the eHealth interventions effect were performed by conducting a standard pairwise meta-analysis and a network meta-analysis for direct and indirect comparisons between eHealth interventions and control/non-intervention. Results: Fifty-one studies were included in the analysis showing a moderate effect size for more than two types of eHealth interventions (-0.46; 95%CI: -0.64, -0.27, p < 0.001 and -0.29; 95%CI: -0.46, -0.13, p < 0.001), phone calls (-0.37; 95%CI: -0.57, -0.17, p < 0.001 and -0.29; 95%CI: -0.52, -0.07, p = 0.011) and smartphone-app (-0.26; 95%CI: -0.50, -0.01, p = 0.040 and -0.40; 95%CI: -0.70, -0.10, p = 0.010) on reducing both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Additionally, i) smartphone-app improved medication adherence by 45%; ii) more than two types of eHealth interventions and emails improved physical activity compliance by 18% and 57% respectively; ii) more than two types of eHealth interventions, phone calls, blood pressure telemonitoring, website and SMS improved blood pressure control between 16% and 30%; and iv) blood pressure telemonitoring showed a week effect on QoL Conclusions: Our study reported eHealth to be a suitable intervention for the self-management of hypertension. Considering our results and the population's accessibility to eHealth devices, eHealth could be a useful and largely scalable tool for the self-management of hypertension. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42020187468.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherElsevier Ltdes_ES
dc.subjectBlood pressurees_ES
dc.subjecteHealthes_ES
dc.subjectHypertensiones_ES
dc.subjectNetwork meta-analysises_ES
dc.titleComparative effect of eHealth interventions on hypertension management-related outcomes: A network meta-analysises_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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