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dc.contributor.authorMartínez, África Martos
dc.contributor.authorMolero-Jurado, María Del Mar
dc.contributor.authorPérez-Fuentes, María del Carmen
dc.contributor.authorSimón Márquez, María Del Mar
dc.contributor.authorBarragán Martín, Ana Belén
dc.contributor.authorGázquez Linares, José Jesús
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-30T17:41:35Z
dc.date.available2021-06-30T17:41:35Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier10.2147/PRBM.S313831
dc.identifier.issn11791578
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/8972
dc.description.abstractBackground: Aggressive behavior in adolescents has become a concern in education, where adapting to and going through high school may generate important behavior problems in adolescents. Purpose: Analyze the relationships between parental and adolescent attitudes toward aggression and empathy. Identify profiles of direct and indirect involvement in school violence and determine differences between groups with respect to the components of empathy and attitudes toward aggression. Methods: The sample was comprised of 1287 high school students who were administered the Beliefs about Aggression and Alternatives questionnaire, the Parental Support for Fighting and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Results: The results show that beliefs in favor of the use of aggression in adolescents correlate positively with the perception of strong support from parents for aggression in response to conflict. Similarly, higher levels of support for the use of nonviolent strategies are positively related to the perception of strong support from parents. The relationships established with the components of empathy analyzed, both cognitive and emotional, were negatively correlated with favorable attitudes toward aggression. Results concerning the groups directly involved indicated that there were significant differences in the components of empathy between the groups. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis applied to the direct involvement groups showed significant differences between the groups in taking perspective. Between-group differences in empathic concern were also statistically significant for the group of active observers. Conclusion: Taking perspective and empathic concern are moderating variables both for observers and victims and their parents in situations of violence.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltdes_ES
dc.subjectAdolescencees_ES
dc.subjectAggressiones_ES
dc.subjectAttitudeses_ES
dc.subjectEmpathyes_ES
dc.subjectSchool violencees_ES
dc.titleThe complex nature of school violence: attitudes toward aggression, empathy and involvement profiles in violencees_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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