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dc.contributor.authorGálvez-García, Germán
dc.contributor.authorAlbayay, Javier
dc.contributor.authorFonseca, Fernando
dc.contributor.authorBascourSandoval, Claudio
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T21:45:56Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T21:45:56Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-15
dc.identifier10.1371/journal.pone.0240627
dc.identifier.issn19326203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/7086
dc.description.abstractThis research was focused on investigating the effectiveness of galvanic cutaneous stimulation and tactile stimulation jointly and individually at mitigating Simulator Adaptation Syndrome. Forty drivers (mean age = 23.1 ± 3.4 years old, twenty women) participated in a driving simulation experiment. Total scores of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire, head movements (an index of body balance), and driving performance variables were compared across four different stimulation conditions: i) baseline (where no stimulation was presented), ii) galvanic cutaneous stimulation and iii) tactile stimulation deployed individually, and iv) both techniques deployed jointly. The results showed that both techniques presented in conjunction alleviate Simulator Adaptation Syndrome and improve driving performance more effectively than when they are presented in isolation. Importantly, reduced head movements were only revealed when galvanic cutaneous stimulation was applied. We concluded that the reduction of this syndrome is due to an improvement of body balance (elicited by galvanic cutaneous stimulation), and a distraction from the symptoms (elicited by tactile stimulation). We encourage the use of both techniques simultaneously to decrease Simulator Adaptation Syndrome.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencees_ES
dc.subjectadaptation síndromees_ES
dc.subjectadultes_ES
dc.subjectarticlees_ES
dc.subjectclinical articlees_ES
dc.subjectcontrolled studyes_ES
dc.subjectfemalees_ES
dc.subjecthead movementes_ES
dc.subjecthumanes_ES
dc.subjecthuman experimentes_ES
dc.subjectsimulationes_ES
dc.subjectSimulator Sickness Questionnairees_ES
dc.subjectSkines_ES
dc.subjecttactile stimulationes_ES
dc.subjectyoung adultes_ES
dc.titleJoint and individual effectiveness of galvanic cutaneous stimulation and tactile stimulation at decreasing Simulator Adaptation Syndromees_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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