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dc.contributor.authorZuniga J.M.
dc.contributor.authorPeck J.L.
dc.contributor.authorSrivastava R.
dc.contributor.authorPierce J.E.
dc.contributor.authorDudley D.R.
dc.contributor.authorThan N.A.
dc.contributor.authorStergiou N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:31:00Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1080/17483107.2017.1398279
dc.identifier.citation14, 1, 68-74
dc.identifier.issn17483107
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/6675
dc.descriptionIntroduction: There is limited knowledge on the use of 3 D-printed transitional prostheses, as they relate to changes in function and strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify functional and strength changes after usage of 3 D-printed transitional prostheses for multiple weeks for children with upper-limb differences. Materials and methods: Gross manual dexterity was assessed using the Box and Block Test and wrist strength was measured using a dynamometer. This testing was conducted before and after a period of 24 ± 2.61 weeks of using a 3 D-printed transitional prosthesis. The 11 children (five girls and six boys; 3–15 years of age) who participated in the study, were fitted with a 3 D-printed transitional partial hand (n = 9) or an arm (n = 2) prosthesis. Results: Separate two-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to analyze function and strength data. There was a significant hand by time interaction for function, but not for strength. Conclusion and relevance to the study of disability and rehabilitation: The increase in manual gross dexterity suggests that the Cyborg Beast 2 3 D-printed prosthesis can be used as a transitional device to improve function in children with traumatic or congenital upper-limb differences.Implications for Rehabilitation Children’s prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, rapid growth, and psychosocial development. Advancements in computer-aided design and additive manufacturing offer the possibility of designing and printing transitional prostheses at a very low cost, but there is limited knowledge on the function of this type of devices. The use of 3D printed transitional prostheses may improve manual gross dexterity in children after several weeks of using it. © 2017, © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis Ltd
dc.subjectAdditive manufacturing
dc.subjectarm
dc.subjectbiomechanics
dc.subjectcomputer-aided design
dc.subjectcustom-made prostheses
dc.subjecthand
dc.subjectmotor control
dc.subjectpaediatric
dc.subjectreaching
dc.subjectdaily life activity
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthandicapped child
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectlimb prosthesis
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectprosthesis design
dc.subjectrehabilitation
dc.subjectthree dimensional printing
dc.subjectupper limb
dc.subjectActivities of Daily Living
dc.subjectArtificial Limbs
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectDisabled Children
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectPrinting, Three-Dimensional
dc.subjectProsthesis Design
dc.subjectUpper Extremity
dc.titleFunctional changes through the usage of 3D-printed transitional prostheses in children
dc.typeArticle


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