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dc.contributor.authorZimmermann E.
dc.contributor.authorBracalenti L.
dc.contributor.authorPiacentini R.
dc.contributor.authorInostroza L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:30:59Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:30:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier10.1016/j.proeng.2016.08.822
dc.identifier.citation161, , 2241-2246
dc.identifier.issn18777058
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/6671
dc.descriptionEnhanced green infrastructure (GI) in urban areas, such as green roofs, parks and green spaces can make a significant contribution to enhancing the provision of fundamental ecosystem services (ES), through nature-based solutions. These positive effects include increasing the interception capacity due to increasing vegetation cover, increasing of storage capacity and infiltration of the soil, thus reducing storm water runoff, producing substantial improvements in the urban drainage system, whose infrastructure is very difficult and expensive to be modified. In this paper an indicator based on the runoff coefficient, which allows quantifying the impact on runoff due to increase of GI is presented. In a second step, a way for relating the indicator with the risk of flooding is proposed. The complete methodology was applied on an urban basin located in the north of Rosario city, Argentina. Four scenarios were evaluated: baseline scenario (current scenario), and three hypothetical (future) scenarios, considering a moderate and severe waterproofing situation respectively, and one green scenario with increased GI. The results show that the moderate and severe waterproofing scenarios produce an increased risk of flooding from 1.9 times to 4 times, respectively. This implies a necessary reinvestment in urban storm water infrastructure in order to keep the original security levels. The green scenario does keep the runoff coefficient, even considering the major increases in population and urbanization. Improving the GI constitutes a strong strategy to adapt to climate and urban changes, to cope with upcoming increases in precipitation and urbanization. © 2016 The Authors.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.sourceSalame C.Aillerie M.Papageorgas P.
dc.subjectclimate change
dc.subjectRisk assessment
dc.subjecturban hydrology
dc.subjectEcosystems
dc.subjectFloods
dc.subjectHydrology
dc.subjectInvestments
dc.subjectRisk assessment
dc.subjectRisk perception
dc.subjectRunoff
dc.subjectStorms
dc.subjectUrban planning
dc.subjectWaterproofing
dc.subjectAdaptation to climate changes
dc.subjectEcosystem services
dc.subjectGreen infrastructure
dc.subjectRunoff coefficients
dc.subjectStorm water runoff
dc.subjectUrban drainage systems
dc.subjectUrban flood risks
dc.subjectUrban hydrology
dc.subjectClimate change
dc.titleUrban Flood Risk Reduction by Increasing Green Areas for Adaptation to Climate Change
dc.typeConference Paper


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