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dc.contributor.authorSalazar R.
dc.contributor.authorPollmann S.
dc.contributor.authorMorales-Quintana L.
dc.contributor.authorHerrera R.
dc.contributor.authorCaparrós-Ruiz D.
dc.contributor.authorRamos P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:27:40Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:27:40Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.12.008
dc.identifier.citation135, , 215-223
dc.identifier.issn09819428
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/6153
dc.descriptionPlants respond to the loss of vertical growth re-orientating their affected organs. In trees, this phenomenon has received the scientific attention due to its importance for the forestry industry. Nowadays it is accepted that auxin distribution is involved in the modulation of the tilting response, but how this distribution is controlled is not fully clear. Auxin transporters that determine the spatio-temporal auxin distribution in radiate pine seedlings exposed to 45° of tilting were identified. Additionally, based on indications for an intimate plant hormone crosstalk in this process, IAA and JA contents were evaluated. The experiments revealed that expression of the auxin transporters was down-regulated in the upper half of the tilted stem, while being induced in the lower half. Moreover, transporter-coding genes were first induced at the apical zone of the stem. IAA was consistently redistributed toward the lower half, which is in accordance with the expression profile of the auxin transporters. In contrast, JA was mainly accumulated in the upper half of tilted stems. Finally, lignin content and monomeric composition were analyzed in both sides of stem and along the time course of tilting. As expected, lignin accumulation was higher at the lower half of stem at longer times of tilting. However, the most marked difference was the accumulation of the H-lignin monomer in the lower half, while the G-lignin unit was more dominant in the upper half. Here, we provide detailed insight in the distribution of IAA and JA, affecting the lignin composition during the tilting response in Pinus radiata seedlings. © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Masson SAS
dc.subjectAuxin transporters
dc.subjectIndole-3-acetic acid
dc.subjectJasmonic acid
dc.subjectLignin composition
dc.subjectPinus radiata
dc.subjectTilting stress
dc.subjectcyclopentane derivative
dc.subjectindoleacetic acid derivative
dc.subjectjasmonic acid
dc.subjectlignin
dc.subjectoxylipin
dc.subjectphytohormone
dc.subjectplant protein
dc.subjectbiosynthesis
dc.subjectDNA sequence
dc.subjectgene expression regulation
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectgrowth, development and aging
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectpine
dc.subjectplant stem
dc.subjectreal time polymerase chain reaction
dc.subjectseedling
dc.subjectCyclopentanes
dc.subjectGene Expression Regulation, Plant
dc.subjectIndoleacetic Acids
dc.subjectLignin
dc.subjectOxylipins
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectPinus
dc.subjectPlant Growth Regulators
dc.subjectPlant Proteins
dc.subjectPlant Stems
dc.subjectReal-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
dc.subjectSeedlings
dc.subjectSequence Analysis, DNA
dc.titleIn seedlings of Pinus radiata, jasmonic acid and auxin are differentially distributed on opposite sides of tilted stems affecting lignin monomer biosynthesis and composition
dc.typeArticle


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