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dc.contributor.authorRuiz-Rudolph P.
dc.contributor.authorArias N.
dc.contributor.authorPardo S.
dc.contributor.authorMeyer M.
dc.contributor.authorMesías S.
dc.contributor.authorGalleguillos C.
dc.contributor.authorSchiattino I.
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:27:34Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier10.1016/j.envint.2016.03.036
dc.identifier.citation92-93, , 130-138
dc.identifier.issn01604120
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/6123
dc.descriptionChile suffers significant pollution from large industrial emitters associated with the mining, metal processing, paper production, and energy industries. The aim of this research was to determine whether the presence of large industrial facilities (i.e. coal- and oil-fired power plants, pulp and paper mills, mining facilities, and smelters) affects mortality and morbidity rates in Chile. For this, we conducted an ecological study that used Chilean communes as small-area observation units to assess mortality and morbidity. Public databases provided information on large pollution sources relevant to Chile. The large sources studied were oil- and coal-fired power plants, copper smelters, pulp and paper mills, and large mining facilities. Large sources were filtered by first year of production, type of process, and size. Mortality and morbidity data were acquired from public national databases, with morbidity being estimated from hospitalization records. Cause-specific rates were calculated for the main outcomes: cardiovascular, respiratory, cancer; and other more specific health outcomes. The impact of the large pollution sources was estimated using Bayesian models that included spatial correlation, overdispersion, and other covariates. Large and significant increases in health risks (around 20%-100%) were found for communes with power plants and smelters for total, cardiovascular, respiratory, all-cancer, and lung cancer mortality. Higher hospitalization rates for cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, cancer, and pneumonia (20-100%) were also found for communes with power plants and smelters. The impacts were larger for men than women in terms of both mortality and hospitalizations. The impacts were also larger when the sources were analyzed as continuous (production volume) rather than dichotomous (presence/absence) variables. In conclusion, significantly higher rates of total cardiovascular, respiratory, all-cancer and lung cancer mortality and cardiovascular, respiratory, cancer and pneumonia hospitalizations were observed in communes with power plants and smelters. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectCardiovascular
dc.subjectCopper smelter
dc.subjectMining facilities
dc.subjectPower plants
dc.subjectRespiratory
dc.subjectBayesian networks
dc.subjectBiological organs
dc.subjectCoal
dc.subjectCopper
dc.subjectFossil fuel power plants
dc.subjectHealth risks
dc.subjectHospitals
dc.subjectIndustrial emissions
dc.subjectIndustrial plants
dc.subjectIndustrial research
dc.subjectPaper and pulp mills
dc.subjectPapermaking machinery
dc.subjectPollution
dc.subjectPopulation statistics
dc.subjectPower plants
dc.subjectPulp
dc.subjectPulp manufacture
dc.subjectSmelting
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectCardio-vascular disease
dc.subjectCardiovascular
dc.subjectCoal-fired power plant
dc.subjectIndustrial facilities
dc.subjectLung cancer mortality
dc.subjectRespiratory
dc.subjectSpatial correlations
dc.subjectDiseases
dc.subjectcancer
dc.subjectcardiovascular disease
dc.subjecthealth impact
dc.subjectindustrial emission
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectpollutant source
dc.subjectpower plant
dc.subjectrespiratory disease
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectBayes theorem
dc.subjectcardiovascular disease
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectcoal mining
dc.subjectecosystem
dc.subjecthealth hazard
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectindustrial area
dc.subjectmedical record
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectneoplasm
dc.subjectpaper industry
dc.subjectpneumonia
dc.subjectpollution
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectpulp mill
dc.subjectrespiratory tract disease
dc.subjectsmelter
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectenvironmental disease
dc.subjectenvironmental exposure
dc.subjectenvironmental monitoring
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthealth status
dc.subjectindustrial waste
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectpollutant
dc.subjectpollution
dc.subjectstatistics and numerical data
dc.subjecttoxicity
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectData Bases
dc.subjectDiseases
dc.subjectEmission
dc.subjectMortality
dc.subjectPower Plants
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBayes Theorem
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectEnvironmental Exposure
dc.subjectEnvironmental Illness
dc.subjectEnvironmental Monitoring
dc.subjectEnvironmental Pollutants
dc.subjectEnvironmental Pollution
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Status
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIndustrial Waste
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMorbidity
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectRespiratory Tract Diseases
dc.titleImpact of large industrial emission sources on mortality and morbidity in Chile: A small-areas study
dc.typeArticle


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