Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPozuelo-Carrascosa D.P.
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez-Bueno C.
dc.contributor.authorCavero-Redondo I.
dc.contributor.authorMorais S.
dc.contributor.authorLee I.M.
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Vizcaíno V.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:25:56Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:25:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1016/j.ejca.2019.03.008
dc.identifier.citation113, , 58-68
dc.identifier.issn09598049
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5842
dc.descriptionBackground: Cardiorespiratory fitness is a strong predictor of all-cause morbidity and mortality; nevertheless, the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the risk of cancer remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to synthetize the evidence on the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and the risk of several sites of cancer in men. Methods: A computerised search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases from their inception to 13th February 2019 was performed. Both fixed and random-effects models were used to calculate the pooled hazard ratio (HR) estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to examine the effect of high and moderate versus low cardiorespiratory fitness on site-specific cancer (lung, colon/rectum, prostate) and all-sites cancer. Results: Ten studies were included in the qualitative review, and seven of them were included in the meta-analysis. Using low cardiorespiratory fitness as the reference group, moderate and high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with a lower risk (HRs) of lung cancer, 0.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.68) and 0.52 (95% CI, 0.42 to 0.61); colorectal cancer, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55 to 0.93) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.62 to 0.92) and all cancer sites, 0.86 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.93) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.87), respectively. Conclusions: Among men, cardiorespiratory fitness plays an important role in protecting against the risk of lung and colorectal cancer. Additionally, this protective effect was observed for all-sites cancer risk. These results show the importance of good cardiorespiratory fitness as a potential factor in cancer prevention. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.subjectCardiorespiratory fitness
dc.subjectMeta-analysis
dc.subjectRisk of cancer
dc.subjectSite-specific cancer
dc.subjectaerobic capacity
dc.subjectcancer localization
dc.subjectcancer risk
dc.subjectcancer staging
dc.subjectcardiorespiratory fitness
dc.subjectcolorectal cancer
dc.subjectEmbase
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectlung cancer
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmalignant neoplasm
dc.subjectMedline
dc.subjectmeta analysis
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectprostate cancer
dc.subjectpublication bias
dc.subjectReview
dc.subjectsensitivity analysis
dc.subjectsystematic review
dc.subjectWeb of Science
dc.subjectcolorectal tumor
dc.subjectlung tumor
dc.subjectneoplasm
dc.subjectproportional hazards model
dc.subjectprostate tumor
dc.subjectCardiorespiratory Fitness
dc.subjectColorectal Neoplasms
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLung Neoplasms
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectProportional Hazards Models
dc.subjectProstatic Neoplasms
dc.titleCardiorespiratory fitness and site-specific risk of cancer in men: A systematic review and meta-analysis
dc.typeReview


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record