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dc.contributor.authorNeila C.
dc.contributor.authorHernández-Moreno D.
dc.contributor.authorFidalgo L.E.
dc.contributor.authorLópez-Beceiro A.
dc.contributor.authorSoler F.
dc.contributor.authorPérez-López M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:24:17Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:24:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.02.025
dc.identifier.citation140, , 24-29
dc.identifier.issn01476513
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5565
dc.descriptionThe aim of this study was to determine heavy metal reference levels for risk assessment studies. For this purpose, the levels of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were determined in liver tissues of wild boars sampled in NW Spain. The mean values were 0.383, 0.326, 23.50 and 56.86 mg/kg dried weight, respectively. In general, the levels detected were similar to or lower than the levels reported in literature. This study not only provides a useful baseline for biomonitoring the levels of the analyzed contaminants in wildlife in NW Spain, it also helps to understand the effects of gender on the levels of these elements. Similar to studies performed in other geographical regions, no significant gender-related differences could be detected. Although differences were not significant, the levels of zinc, cadmium and lead were modestly higher in males (55.78, 0.346 and 0.424 mg/kg, respectively) compared to females (45.25, 0.305 and 0.341 mg/kg). Our results indicate that, although gender did not significantly affect heavy metal uptake and toxicokinetics of contaminants in wild boars, these effects could vary between species, populations, organs, and elements. It is therefore essential to investigate gender-related differences for each species. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectLiver
dc.subjectMetal
dc.subjectWild boar
dc.subjectcadmium
dc.subjectcopper
dc.subjectheavy metal
dc.subjectlead
dc.subjectzinc
dc.subjectcadmium
dc.subjectcopper
dc.subjectheavy metal
dc.subjectzinc
dc.subjectbiomonitoring
dc.subjectgender relations
dc.subjectheavy metal
dc.subjectpig
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbioaccumulation
dc.subjectbiological monitoring
dc.subjectconcentration (parameters)
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectenvironmental impact assessment
dc.subjectEuropean wild boar
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectsex difference
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjecttissue distribution
dc.subjectwildlife
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectdrug effects
dc.subjectenvironmental monitoring
dc.subjectliver
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectpig
dc.subjectprocedures
dc.subjectsexual development
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjectSus scrofa
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCadmium
dc.subjectCopper
dc.subjectEnvironmental Monitoring
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectLiver
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMetals, Heavy
dc.subjectSex Characteristics
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjectSus scrofa
dc.subjectSwine
dc.subjectZinc
dc.titleDoes gender influence the levels of heavy metals in liver of wild boar?
dc.typeArticle


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