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dc.contributor.authorNaeini M.B.
dc.contributor.authorMomtazi A.A.
dc.contributor.authorJaafari M.R.
dc.contributor.authorJohnston T.P.
dc.contributor.authorBarreto G.
dc.contributor.authorBanach M.
dc.contributor.authorSahebkar A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:24:13Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:24:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1002/jcp.28262
dc.identifier.citation234, 9, 14743-14758
dc.identifier.issn00219541
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5543
dc.descriptionLipid metabolism plays an important role in cancer development due to the necessities of rapidly dividing cells to increase structural, energetic, and biosynthetic demands for cell proliferation. Basically, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other related diseases, and cancer are associated with a common hyperactivated “lipogenic state.” Recent evidence suggests that metabolic reprogramming and overproduction of enzymes involved in the synthesis of fatty acids are the new hallmarks of cancer, which occur in an early phase of tumorigenesis. As the first evidence to confirm dysregulated lipid metabolism in cancer cells, the overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) was observed in breast cancer patients and demonstrated the role of FAS in cancer. Other enzymes of fatty acid synthesis have recently been found to be dysregulated in cancer, including ATP-dependent citrate lyase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which further underscores the connection of these metabolic pathways with cancer cell survival and proliferation. The degree of overexpression of lipogenic enzymes and elevated lipid utilization in tumors is closely associated with cancer progression. The question that arises is whether the progression of cancer can be suppressed, or at least decelerated, by modulating gene expression related to fatty acid metabolism. Curcumin, due to its effects on the regulation of lipogenic enzymes, might be able to suppress, or even cause regression of tumor growth. This review discusses recent evidence concerning the important role of lipogenic enzymes in the metabolism of cancer cells and whether the inhibitory effects of curcumin on lipogenic enzymes is therapeutically efficacious. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley-Liss Inc.
dc.subjectcurcumin
dc.subjectenzyme
dc.subjectlipid
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjecttumor
dc.subject3 hydroxy 3 methylglutaryl coenzyme A
dc.subjectadenosine triphosphate citrate synthase
dc.subjectcarnitine palmitoyltransferase I
dc.subjectcholesterol acyltransferase
dc.subjectcurcumin
dc.subjectfatty acid synthase
dc.subjectlipid
dc.subjectliver X receptor
dc.subjectprotein
dc.subjectscd1 protein
dc.subjectsterol o acyltransferase 1
dc.subjectunclassified drug
dc.subjectantineoplastic activity
dc.subjectcancer cell
dc.subjectcancer therapy
dc.subjectdrug effect
dc.subjectenzyme inhibition
dc.subjectevidence based practice
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectlipid metabolism
dc.subjectlipogenesis
dc.subjectmalignant neoplasm
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectReview
dc.titleAntitumor effects of curcumin: A lipid perspective
dc.typeReview


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