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dc.contributor.authorMoghaddam N.S.A.
dc.contributor.authorOskouie M.N.
dc.contributor.authorButler A.E.
dc.contributor.authorPetit P.X.
dc.contributor.authorBarreto G.E.
dc.contributor.authorSahebkar A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:23:03Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:23:03Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1002/jcp.27880
dc.identifier.citation234, 7, 10060-10071
dc.identifier.issn00219541
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5352
dc.descriptionCurcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of the yellow powder prepared from the roots of Curcuma longa or Zingiberaceae (known as turmeric) is not only widely used to color and flavor food but also used as a pharmaceutical agent. Curcumin demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antiaging, and antioxidant activity, as well as efficacy in wound healing. Notably, curcumin is a hormetic agent (hormetin), as it is stimulatory at low doses and inhibitory at high doses. Hormesis by curcumin could be also a particular function at low doses (i.e., antioxidant behavior) and another function at high dose (i.e., induction of autophagy and cell death). Recent findings suggest that curcumin exhibits biphasic dose–responses on cells, with low doses having stronger effects than high doses; examples being activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway or antioxidant activity. This indicates that many effects induced by curcumin are dependent on dose and some effects might be greater at lower doses, indicative of a hormetic response. Despite the consistent occurrence of hormetic responses of curcumin in a wide range of biomedical models, epidemiological and clinical trials are needed to assess the nature of curcumin’s dose–response in humans. Fortunately, more than one hundred clinical trials with curcumin and curcumin derivatives are ongoing. In this review, we provide the first comprehensive analysis supportive of the hormetic behavior of curcumin and curcumin derivatives. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley-Liss Inc.
dc.subjectbiphasic effect
dc.subjectcurcumin
dc.subjecthormesis
dc.subjecthormetic response
dc.subjectcurcumin
dc.subjectheat shock protein
dc.subjectnonsteroid antiinflammatory agent
dc.subjectcurcumin
dc.subjectaging
dc.subjectAlzheimer disease
dc.subjectCurcuma longa
dc.subjectdrug effect
dc.subjectgastrointestinal toxicity
dc.subjectheart protection
dc.subjecthormesis
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectliver toxicity
dc.subjectmalignant neoplasm
dc.subjectmetabolic syndrome X
dc.subjectmorphine tolerance
dc.subjectnephrotoxicity
dc.subjectneuroprotection
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectReview
dc.subjectstress
dc.subjectsystematic review
dc.subjectwound healing
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjecthormesis
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCurcumin
dc.subjectHormesis
dc.subjectHumans
dc.titleHormetic effects of curcumin: What is the evidence?
dc.typeReview


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