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dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Valderrama J.
dc.contributor.authorIbáñez J.
dc.contributor.authorDel Barrio G.
dc.contributor.authorAlcalá F.J.
dc.contributor.authorSanjuán M.E.
dc.contributor.authorRuiz A.
dc.contributor.authorHirche A.
dc.contributor.authorPuigdefábregas J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:22:31Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:22:31Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.058
dc.identifier.citation613-614, , 1489-1497
dc.identifier.issn00489697
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5262
dc.descriptionThis work illustrates the application of a simulation model to analyse how swiftly large-scale land-use changes can drive broad territories to collapse. In this sense, the economic needs of a population should not clash with the natural environment but rather be reconciled with it. Abundant literature deals with the integration of socioeconomic drivers, ecological aspects, farming management, and climatology related to Algerian rangeland degradation. The present study seeks to compare the time course of Alfa grass biomass and the livestock raised on these distinctive rangelands under two different land-use strategies. The traditional one has nomads as the main inhabitants of these lands. For centuries, their strategy for alleviating pressure on resources was to move from one area to other. The more recent sedentary land-use leads to overgrazing supported by the massive use of cheap supplemental feed. Additionally, the model was used as a platform to launch scenarios for sustainable land-use management under a competitive market-economy. A key finding for preserving grazing resources was the increment of supplemental feed prices, which is compatible with stocking rates higher than the historical ones. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.subjectDesertification
dc.subjectFood security
dc.subjectLand-use changes
dc.subjectOvergrazing
dc.subjectRangelands
dc.subjectSD modelling
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectClimatology
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectFood supply
dc.subjectDesertification
dc.subjectFood security
dc.subjectLand-use change
dc.subjectOvergrazing
dc.subjectRangelands
dc.subjectLand use
dc.subjectdesertification
dc.subjectfood security
dc.subjectland management
dc.subjectland use change
dc.subjectmodeling
dc.subjectovergrazing
dc.subjectrangeland
dc.subjectresource management
dc.subjectsteppe
dc.subjectsustainable development
dc.subjectAlgeria
dc.subjectanimal food
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectbreeding
dc.subjectclimate
dc.subjectdesertification
dc.subjecteconomic aspect
dc.subjectenvironmental impact
dc.subjectenvironmental sustainability
dc.subjectfarming system
dc.subjectgrazing
dc.subjectgrazing management
dc.subjectlandscape ecology
dc.subjectlivestock
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectrangeland
dc.subjectruminant
dc.subjectsimulation
dc.subjectsteppe
dc.subjectStipa tenacissima
dc.subjectvegetation
dc.subjectAlgeria
dc.titleDoomed to collapse: Why Algerian steppe rangelands are overgrazed and some lessons to help land-use transitions
dc.typeArticle


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