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dc.contributor.authorMartín Martín J.M.
dc.contributor.authorArrobas Velilla T.
dc.contributor.authorCañizares Diaz J.I.
dc.contributor.authorIllescas Rodriguez M.
dc.contributor.authorPardo Álvarez J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:22:24Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:22:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier10.1016/j.angio.2014.07.007
dc.identifier.citation67, 2, 107-117
dc.identifier.issn00033170
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5220
dc.descriptionIntroduction The coordination between levels of care is an essential element to increase the efficiency of the health system. Vascular diseases, in particular would benefit from this due to its frequency, severity and vulnerability. Owing to the high prevalence of the disease, there is currently a disproportionate number of patients being referred from Primary Care (AP) to Specialist Units (AE), with a suspected diagnosis of chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs (IVC MMII) without really having this diagnosis confirmed. This leads to collapse in AE consultations, diagnostic delay, lost workdays, as well as all the public health, social and economic repercussions. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the reality of this disease in the Huelva Costa Health District. Patients and methods A descriptive study was conducted on a population of Huelva Coast Area Health seen by a Primary Care doctor to consult on lower limb venous pathology. The study also included a questionnaire to determine the level of knowledge about this disease of the Primary Care physician, as well as the need for conducting continuing education courses and analyse whether these courses provide professionals with the necessary skills for a good daily practice against this clinical condition. Results The first data obtained show that only 42.4% of cases referred from Primary Care had a correct diagnosis. There is a statistically significant association between diagnostic accuracy and risk factors/symptoms, such as nearby heat source, a family history of varicose veins, heavy legs, thick veins in the lower limbs, swelling of the legs at the end of the day, and being female. Conclusion There appears to be an inappropriately high number of patients referred from Primary Care to Specialists due to suspicion of IVC, in which the diagnosis is not confirmed. © 2014 SEACV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoes
dc.publisherViguera Editores S.L.
dc.subjectPalabras clave Atención primaria Insuficiencia venosa crónica Diagnóstico Patología venosa
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectchronic vein insufficiency
dc.subjectdescriptive research
dc.subjectdiagnostic accuracy
dc.subjectdiagnostic test accuracy study
dc.subjectfamily history
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgeneral practitioner
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectleg swelling
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpatient care
dc.subjectprimary medical care
dc.subjectprofessional knowledge
dc.subjectrisk factor
dc.subjectsex difference
dc.subjectvaricosis
dc.titleDescriptive study of management of chronic venous insufficiency between levels of care [Estudio descriptivo del manejo de la insuficiencia venosa crónica entre niveles asistenciales]
dc.typeArticle


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