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dc.contributor.authorMaccari L.
dc.contributor.authorPasini A.
dc.contributor.authorCaroli E.
dc.contributor.authorRosa C.
dc.contributor.authorMarotta A.
dc.contributor.authorMartella D.
dc.contributor.authorFuentes L.J.
dc.contributor.authorCasagrande M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:21:56Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:21:56Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier10.1007/s10803-014-2148-0
dc.identifier.citation44, 11, 2871-2881
dc.identifier.issn01623257
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5153
dc.descriptionThis study assessed visual search abilities, tested through the flicker task, in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Twenty-two children diagnosed with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children were told to detect changes in objects of central interest or objects of marginal interest (MI) embedded in either emotion-laden (positive or negative) or neutral real-world pictures. The results showed that emotion-laden pictures equally interfered with performance of both ASD and TD children, slowing down reaction times compared with neutral pictures. Children with ASD were faster than TD children, particularly in detecting changes in MI objects, the most difficult condition. However, their performance was less accurate than performance of TD children just when the pictures were negative. These findings suggest that children with ASD have better visual search abilities than TD children only when the search is particularly difficult and requires strong serial search strategies. The emotional–social impairment that is usually considered as a typical feature of ASD seems to be limited to processing of negative emotional information. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorders
dc.subjectChange blindness
dc.subjectChange detection
dc.subjectEmotional processing
dc.subjectFlicker task
dc.subjectVisual search
dc.subjectaccuracy
dc.subjectadolescent
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectAsperger syndrome
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectclinical article
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectemotion
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectintelligence quotient
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectresponse time
dc.subjectstatistical significance
dc.subjectvision
dc.subjectautism
dc.subjectemotion
dc.subjectperception
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectpsychology
dc.subjectreaction time
dc.subjectvision
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Development Disorders, Pervasive
dc.subjectEmotions
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectReaction Time
dc.subjectSocial Perception
dc.subjectVisual Perception
dc.titleVisual search and emotion: How children with autism spectrum disorders scan emotional scenes
dc.typeArticle


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