Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLópez-Villarreal A.
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Morla E.M.
dc.contributor.authorJiménez-López E.
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Vizcaíno V.
dc.contributor.authorAparicio A.I.
dc.contributor.authorMateo-Sotos J.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Jimenez R.
dc.contributor.authorVieta E.
dc.contributor.authorSantos J.L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:21:54Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier10.1016/j.jad.2020.03.140
dc.identifier.citation272, , 249-258
dc.identifier.issn01650327
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5142
dc.descriptionBackground: Functional impairment is commonly encountered among patients with bipolar disorder (BD) during periods of remission. The distribution of the impairment of the functional outcome is heterogeneous. The objective of this current investigation was to identify neurocognitive and clinical predictors of psychosocial functioning in a sample of patients with BD. Methods: Seventy-six patients (59.2% females) and 40 healthy controls (50% females), aged 18 to 55 years, were assessed using a comprehensive neurocognitive battery (six neurocognitive domains), and the Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST), at baseline and after a 5-year follow-up. Stepwise regression models were used to identify predictor variables related to psychosocial functioning. Results: The number of hospitalizations during the follow-up, the change occurred in the neurocognitive composite index (NCI change), and NCI at baseline explained 30.8% of the variance of functioning. The number of hospitalizations during the follow-up was the variable that explained a greater percentage of the variance (16.9%). Verbal memory at baseline and the change in sustained attention during the follow-up explained 10% and 5.9% of the variance of the psychosocial functioning, respectively. Limitations: The interval of 5 years between the two assessments could be too short to detect a possible progression in functional outcome for the overall sample. Conclusions: The clinical course during the follow-up is the factor that has a greater impact on psychosocial functioning in patients with BD. Thus, the interventions aimed to promote prevention of relapses should be considered as essential for avoiding functional impairment in these patients. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.subjectBipolar disorder
dc.subjectFollow-up
dc.subjectNeurocognition
dc.subjectNeuroprogression
dc.subjectPsychosocial functioning
dc.subjectanticonvulsive agent
dc.subjectbenzodiazepine derivative
dc.subjectlithium
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbipolar I disorder
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdisease course
dc.subjectelectroconvulsive therapy
dc.subjectexecutive function
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectfollow up
dc.subjectfunctional disease
dc.subjectFunctioning Assessment Short Test
dc.subjectHamilton Depression Rating Scale
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectintelligence quotient
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmedical history
dc.subjectmental patient
dc.subjectoutcome assessment
dc.subjectprediction
dc.subjectpredictor variable
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectpsychologic assessment
dc.subjectrelapse
dc.subjectremission
dc.subjectsocial psychology
dc.subjectStroop test
dc.subjectStructured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders
dc.subjecttrail making test
dc.subjectverbal memory
dc.subjectvisual memory
dc.subjectWechsler adult intelligence scale
dc.subjectWechsler memory scale
dc.subjectWisconsin Card Sorting Test
dc.subjectYoung Mania Rating Scale
dc.titlePredictive factors of functional outcome in patients with bipolar I disorder: a five-year follow-up
dc.typeArticle


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record