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dc.contributor.authorLucena J.
dc.contributor.authorMora E.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez L.
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz M.
dc.contributor.authorCantin M.G.
dc.contributor.authorFonseca G.M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:21:49Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:21:49Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier10.1016/j.forsciint.2016.06.025
dc.identifier.citation266, , e32-e37
dc.identifier.issn03790738
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/5116
dc.descriptionTo confirm the nature and forensic significance of questioned skeletal material submitted a medico-legal setting is a relatively common procedure, although not without difficulties when the remains are fragmented or burned. Different methodologies have been described for this purpose, many of them invasive, time and money consuming or dependent on the availability of the analytical instrument. We present a case in which skeletal material with unusual conditions of preservation and curious discovery was sent to a medico-legal setting to determine its human/nonhuman origin. A combined strategy of imagenological procedures (macroscopic, radiographic and cone beam computed tomography – CBCT-technology) was performed as non-invasive and rapid methods to assess the nonhuman nature of the material, specifically of pig (Sus scrofa) origin. This hypothesis was later confirmed by DNA analysis. CBCT data sets provide accurate three-dimensional reconstructions, which demonstrate its reliable use as a forensic tool. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd
dc.subjectCone-beam computed tomography
dc.subjectForensic anthropology
dc.subjectForensic dentistry
dc.subjectHuman remains
dc.subjectSpecies determination
dc.subjectDNA fragment
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectcone beam computed tomography
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectDNA determination
dc.subjectDNA sequence
dc.subjectforensic identification
dc.subjectimage analysis
dc.subjectimage reconstruction
dc.subjectmeasurement accuracy
dc.subjectmedicolegal aspect
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectpig
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectreliability
dc.subjectthree dimensional imaging
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectcase report
dc.subjectdiagnostic imaging
dc.subjectDNA fingerprinting
dc.subjectforensic science
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmaxilla
dc.subjectpig
dc.subjectspecies difference
dc.subjecttooth
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCone-Beam Computed Tomography
dc.subjectDNA Fingerprinting
dc.subjectForensic Sciences
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImaging, Three-Dimensional
dc.subjectMaxilla
dc.subjectSpecies Specificity
dc.subjectSwine
dc.subjectTooth
dc.titleCone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for the analysis of nonhuman skeletal remains in a medico-legal setting
dc.typeArticle


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