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dc.contributor.authorJiménez-López E.
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Morla E.M.
dc.contributor.authorLópez-Villarreal A.
dc.contributor.authorAparicio A.I.
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Vizcaíno V.
dc.contributor.authorVieta E.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Jimenez R.
dc.contributor.authorSantos J.L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:21:01Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1016/j.eurpsy.2018.11.008
dc.identifier.citation56, , 60-68
dc.identifier.issn09249338
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4974
dc.descriptionBackground: Bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by neurocognitive and functional deficits with marked heterogeneity. It has been suggested that BD with a history of psychotic symptoms (BD-P) could constitute a phenotypically homogeneous subtype characterized by greater neurocognitive and functional impairments, or by a distinct trajectory of such deficits. The aim of this study was to compare the neurocognitive and functional course of euthymic BD-P, euthymic BD patients without a history of psychosis (BD-NP), stabilized patients with schizophrenia and healthy subjects, during a five-year follow-up. Methods: Neurocognitive and psychosocial function was examined in 100 euthymic patients with BD (50 BD-P, 50 BD-NP), 50 stabilized patients with schizophrenia (SZ), and 51 healthy controls (HC) at baseline (T1), and after a 5-year follow-up (T2). Results: The course of both neurocognitive performance and functional outcome of patients with SZ and BD (BD-P and BD-NP) is stable. The profile of neurocognitive impairment of patients with SZ or BD (BD-P and BD-NP), is similar, with only quantitative differences circumscribed to certain domains, such as working memory. The subgroup of patients with BD-NP does not show functional deterioration. Conclusions: We have not found evidence of progression in the neurocognitive or psychosocial impairment in any of the three groups of patients, although it cannot be dismissed the possibility of a subset of patients with a progressive course. Other longitudinal studies with larger samples and longer duration are necessary to confirm these findings. © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Masson SAS
dc.subjectBipolar disorder
dc.subjectFollow-up
dc.subjectNeurocognition
dc.subjectPsychosis
dc.subjectPsychosocial functioning
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbipolar disorder
dc.subjectbipolar I disorder
dc.subjectcognition
dc.subjectcognitive defect
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdeterioration
dc.subjectdisease exacerbation
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectfollow up
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectoutcome assessment
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectprospective study
dc.subjectpsychosis
dc.subjectschizophrenia
dc.subjectsocial psychology
dc.subjectworking memory
dc.subjectcognition
dc.subjectcyclothymia
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectneuropsychological test
dc.subjectpathophysiology
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectpsychology
dc.subjectpsychosis
dc.subjectschizophrenia
dc.subjectshort term memory
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectCognition
dc.subjectCyclothymic Disorder
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studies
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMemory, Short-Term
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Tests
dc.subjectPsychotic Disorders
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.titleNeurocognition and functional outcome in patients with psychotic, non-psychotic bipolar I disorder, and schizophrenia. A five-year follow-up
dc.typeArticle


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