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dc.contributor.authorJiménez-López E.
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Morla E.M.
dc.contributor.authorAparicio A.I.
dc.contributor.authorLópez-Villarreal A.
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Vizcaíno V.
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Jimenez R.
dc.contributor.authorVieta E.
dc.contributor.authorSantos J.L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:21:01Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier10.1016/j.jad.2017.12.094
dc.identifier.citation229, , 177-185
dc.identifier.issn01650327
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4973
dc.descriptionBackground More than 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) do not reach full psychosocial functioning, even during periods of euthymia. It has been suggested that history of psychotic symptoms is one of the factors which are associated with a worse functional outcome. The objective was to compare psychosocial functioning between patients with BD, with (BD-P), and without (BD-NP) a history of psychotic symptoms, and to examine whether the history of psychotic symptoms, or other clinical or neurocognitive variables predict psychosocial functioning. Methods Psychosocial functioning and neurocognition were examined in 100 euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder (50 BD-P, and 50 BD-NP), compared to 50 stabilised patients with schizophrenia (SZ), and 51 healthy controls (HC). Results 1) There were no differences between BD-P and BD-NP in the GAF-F score or in the FAST total score. 2) The two groups of patients with BD had better scores than SZ both in the GAF-F, and in all measures of the FAST, except for the subscale leisure time. 3) The neurocognitive composite index, verbal memory and subclinical depressive symptoms were the variables which explained a higher percentage of the variance of functional outcome. Limitations The cross-sectional design, and the relatively small sample size are the main limitations. Conclusions A history of psychotic symptoms has no relevant impact on the level of psychosocial functioning in BD. Neurocognitive dysfunction and subclinical depressive symptoms are the variables that best explain the functional impairment. These findings have important clinical implications. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.subjectBipolar disorder
dc.subjectPsychosis
dc.subjectPsychosocial functioning
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectanticonvulsive agent
dc.subjectantidepressant agent
dc.subjectchlorpromazine
dc.subjectlithium
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectanticonvulsant therapy
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbipolar I disorder
dc.subjectclinical evaluation
dc.subjectcognition
dc.subjectcomparative study
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectcorrelational study
dc.subjectcross-sectional study
dc.subjectdepression
dc.subjectdisorders of higher cerebral function
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectfunctional disease
dc.subjectfunctional status
dc.subjectfunctional status assessment
dc.subjectFunctioning Assessment Short Test
dc.subjectHamilton Depression Rating Scale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectleisure
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmedical history
dc.subjectmemory disorder
dc.subjectmental patient
dc.subjectPositive and Negative Syndrome Scale
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectpsychopharmacotherapy
dc.subjectpsychosis
dc.subjectschizophrenia
dc.subjectsocial psychology
dc.subjectverbal memory
dc.subjectYoung Mania Rating Scale
dc.subjectbipolar disorder
dc.subjectcase control study
dc.subjectcomplication
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectneuropsychological test
dc.subjectpsychology
dc.subjectpsychosis
dc.subjectschizophrenia
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectCase-Control Studies
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Tests
dc.subjectPsychotic Disorders
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectSchizophrenic Psychology
dc.titlePsychosocial functioning in patients with psychotic and non-psychotic bipolar I disorder. A comparative study with individuals with schizophrenia
dc.typeArticle


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