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dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Hermoso A.
dc.contributor.authorHormazábal-Aguayo I.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Calderón N.
dc.contributor.authorRussell-Guzmán J.
dc.contributor.authorVicencio-Rojas F.
dc.contributor.authorChacana-Cañas C.
dc.contributor.authorUrrutia-Reyes I.
dc.contributor.authorRamírez-Vélez R.
dc.contributor.authorAlonso-Martinez A.M.
dc.contributor.authorIzquierdo M.
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Vergara O.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:18:48Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:18:48Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier10.1016/j.jsams.2020.02.012
dc.identifier.citation23, 9, 854-859
dc.identifier.issn14402440
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4629
dc.descriptionObjectives: The aim of the present study was to test a before-school physical activity intervention (Active-Start intervention) on blood pressure in children and examine whether sedentary time moderates the effect of the intervention on blood pressure. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Methods: The Active-Start intervention comprising 170 children (8–10 years old) from three public schools with low socioeconomic status in Santiago (Chile). The exercise intervention was delivered daily, before starting the first school-class (8:00–8:30 a.m.), for 8 weeks. The intervention was mainly a program of cooperative physical games at moderate-vigorous intensity. Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure was determined from the average of two measurements at baseline and at the end of intervention. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time was assessed using a GENEActiv tri-axial accelerometer prior to the program intervention. Results: The Active-Start intervention decreased blood pressure levels in children (p < 0.01) but did not change relative to the control group. Johnson–Neyman analysis revealed a significant relationship between the effect of intervention on systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure when sedentary time was below, but not at or above, 657 and 659 min per day (i.e., the effect of physical exercise disappears), respectively. Conclusions: The effect of physical activity on blood pressure could disappear in children with excessive sedentary time, which highlights the need to reduce total levels of sedentary time in the day-to-day life of young people in and out of schools. © 2020 Sports Medicine Australia
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.subjectDiastolic blood pressure
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectModeration analysis
dc.subjectSystolic blood pressure
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectblood pressure
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectchildhood obesity
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdepressed blood pressure
dc.subjectdiastolic blood pressure
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthypertension
dc.subjectInternational Obesity Task Force
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmean arterial pressure
dc.subjectphysical activity
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial
dc.subjectsedentary time
dc.subjectsocial status
dc.subjectsystolic blood pressure
dc.titleExercise program and blood pressure in children: The moderating role of sedentary time
dc.typeArticle


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