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dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Hermoso A.
dc.contributor.authorHormazábal-Aguayo I.
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Vergara O.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Calderón N.
dc.contributor.authorRussell-Guzmán J.
dc.contributor.authorVicencio-Rojas F.
dc.contributor.authorChacana-Cañas C.
dc.contributor.authorRamírez-Vélez R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:18:48Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:18:48Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier10.1111/sms.13537
dc.identifier.citation30, 1, 108-116
dc.identifier.issn09057188
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4627
dc.descriptionThe aim of the study was threefold: (a) to test a before-school physical activity intervention (Active-Start) on academic performance, selective attention, and concentration capacity; (b) to test the effect of the Active-Start intervention on anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness parameters; and (c) whether the physical fitness components are moderators of the effect of the Active-Start program on academic performance, selective attention, and concentration capacity in Chilean children. The Active-Start intervention was a RCT which comprised 170 children (8-10 years old) from three public schools with low socioeconomic status from the city of Santiago (Chile). The exercise intervention was delivered daily, before starting the first school-class (8:00-8:30 am) for 8 weeks. Changes in academic performance, selective attention and concentration capacity, anthropometric, body composition, and physical fitness parameters were measured. The analyses used were mixed regression models for repeated measures over time. No statistically significant changes in attention and concentration capacity were found. However, significant changes were seen in language (0.63; 95% CI 0.49-0.77) and mathematics (0.49; 95% CI 0.32-0.66) performance (P <.001). Also, improvements were seen in fat mass, fat-free mass, muscular, and cardiorespiratory fitness (all P <.05). The Johnson-Neyman technique revealed a significant relationship between the effect of intervention and attention and concentration when change in cardiorespiratory fitness was above, but not below, 3.05 and 0.70 mL/kg/min, respectively. Implementing before-school physical activity programs such as the Active-Start to enhance the cardiorespiratory fitness may benefit attention capacity and academic success among schoolchildren. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard
dc.subjectacademic achievement
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectcardiorespiratory fitness
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjectacademic success
dc.subjectanthropometry
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectbody composition
dc.subjectcardiorespiratory fitness
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectChilean
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjectfat free mass
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthuman experiment
dc.subjectlanguage
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmathematics
dc.subjectphysical activity
dc.subjectschool child
dc.subjectselective attention
dc.subjectsocial status
dc.subjectacademic success
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectcognition
dc.subjectphysical education
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectsocial class
dc.subjectAcademic Success
dc.subjectAnthropometry
dc.subjectAttention
dc.subjectBody Composition
dc.subjectCardiorespiratory Fitness
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectCognition
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectPhysical Education and Training
dc.subjectSchools
dc.subjectSocial Class
dc.titleA before-school physical activity intervention to improve cognitive parameters in children: The Active-Start study
dc.typeArticle


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