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dc.contributor.authorDe Carlos F.
dc.contributor.authorCobo J.
dc.contributor.authorMacías E.
dc.contributor.authorFeito J.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález M.
dc.contributor.authorCobo T.
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Mondragón M.P.
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Suárez O.
dc.contributor.authorVega J.A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:16:09Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:16:09Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier10.14670/HH-11-593
dc.identifier.citation30, 7, 865-874
dc.identifier.issn02133911
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4218
dc.descriptionObstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by repetitive breathing during sleep that lead to reduced oxygen saturation and sleep disturbance among other symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by blockade of the upper respiratory airway, although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this occlusion remains unknown. In these studies we explored the hypothesis that alterations in the innervation, especially mechanosensory innervation, of the pharynx may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the innervation of the human pharynx in normal individuals and in subjects clinically diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. Using immunohistochemistry for axon and Schwann cells, as well as for two putative mechanoproteins (ASIC2 and TRPV4), we observed a significant reduction in the density of nerve fibers in the submucosa of patients with obstructive sleep apnea as well as morphological abnormalities in mechanosensory corpuscles. Importantly, while ASIC2 and TRPV4 expression was regularly found in the axons of mechanosensory corpuscles distributed throughout the muscular layer in the control subjects, it was absent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These findings support that neurological alterations are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. © 2015 Histology and Histopathology. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherHistology and Histopathology
dc.subjectMechanoproteins
dc.subjectMechanosensory innervation
dc.subjectNerve fibres
dc.subjectUpper airways
dc.subjectacid sensing ion channel
dc.subjectASIC2 protein, human
dc.subjectenolase
dc.subjectprotein S 100
dc.subjectTRPV4 protein, human
dc.subjectvanilloid receptor
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectaxon
dc.subjectbiological model
dc.subjectcase control study
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectimmunohistochemistry
dc.subjectinnervation
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmechanotransduction
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectpathology
dc.subjectpathophysiology
dc.subjectpharynx
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectSchwann cell
dc.subjectSleep Apnea, Obstructive
dc.subjectAcid Sensing Ion Channels
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAxons
dc.subjectCase-Control Studies
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImmunohistochemistry
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMechanotransduction, Cellular
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectModels, Neurological
dc.subjectPharynx
dc.subjectPhosphopyruvate Hydratase
dc.subjectS100 Proteins
dc.subjectSchwann Cells
dc.subjectSleep Apnea, Obstructive
dc.subjectTRPV Cation Channels
dc.titleReduced Innervation in the human pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea
dc.typeArticle


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