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dc.contributor.authorColom-Piella G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:15:00Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:15:00Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier10.1080/03071847.2019.1700685
dc.identifier.citation164, 7, 32-41
dc.identifier.issn03071847
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/4064
dc.descriptionAt 0.92% of GDP in 2019 and with the expectation that this figure will remain frozen until 2022, Spain’s defence budget is, proportionally, the second-lowest of the NATO countries obliged to meet the 2% target. However, €12.9 billion has just been committed to replace older weaponry and ensure work for the country’s defence industry. With a public debt that hinders military planning and no budgetary stability to guarantee the financing and maintenance of weapons and equipment, Spain risks fielding inoperative armed forces incapable of either contributing to collective security or satisfying the country’s defence needs. Guillem Colom-Piella explores the current situation and its potential implications. © 2019, © RUSI Journal 2019.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.titleA New Debt Burden for Spain’s Defence Planning
dc.typeArticle


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