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dc.contributor.authorCastro-Santos P.
dc.contributor.authorDíaz-Peña R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:14:21Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:14:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier10.1007/s10067-017-3744-0
dc.identifier.citation36, 9, 1935-1947
dc.identifier.issn07703198
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3963
dc.descriptionMost rheumatic diseases are complex or multifactorial entities with pathogeneses that interact with both multiple genetic factors and a high number of diverse environmental factors. Knowledge of the human genome sequence and its diversity among populations has provided a crucial step forward in our understanding of genetic diseases, identifying many genetic loci or genes associated with diverse phenotypes. In general, susceptibility to autoimmunity is associated with multiple risk factors, but the mechanism of the environmental component influence is poorly understood. Studies in twins have demonstrated that genetics do not explain the totality of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. One method of modulating gene expression through environmental effects is via epigenetic modifications. These techniques open a new field for identifying useful new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this context, the development of “-omics” techniques is an opportunity to progress in our knowledge of complex diseases, impacting the discovery of new potential biomarkers suitable for their introduction into clinical practice. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the fields of genomics and epigenomics in rheumatic diseases and their potential to be useful for the diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment of these diseases. The ultimate aim of genomic studies in any human disease is to understand its pathogenesis, thereby enabling the prediction of the evolution of the disease to establish new treatments and address the development of personalized therapies. © 2017, International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer London
dc.subjectBiomarker
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectEpigenetics
dc.subjectEpigenomics
dc.subjectGenomics
dc.subjectRheumatic diseases
dc.subjectcytokine
dc.subjectankylosing spondylitis
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectclinical practice
dc.subjectdisease course
dc.subjectepigenetics
dc.subjectfollow up
dc.subjectgenetic association
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectgenomics
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmolecular biology
dc.subjectosteoarthritis
dc.subjectpathogenesis
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectrheumatic disease
dc.subjectrheumatoid arthritis
dc.subjectsystemic lupus erythematosus
dc.subjectdisease management
dc.subjectgenetic marker
dc.subjectgenetic predisposition
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectphenotype
dc.subjectrheumatic disease
dc.subjectDisease Management
dc.subjectEpigenomics
dc.subjectGenetic Markers
dc.subjectGenetic Predisposition to Disease
dc.subjectGenomics
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPhenotype
dc.subjectRheumatic Diseases
dc.titleGenomics and epigenomics in rheumatic diseases: what do they provide in terms of diagnosis and disease management?
dc.typeArticle


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