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dc.contributor.authorCalderón R.
dc.contributor.authorPalma P.
dc.contributor.authorEltit K.
dc.contributor.authorArancibia-Miranda N.
dc.contributor.authorSilva-Moreno E.
dc.contributor.authorYu W.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:13:47Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:13:47Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137411
dc.identifier.citation719, , -
dc.identifier.issn00489697
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3869
dc.descriptionThe application of excessive fertilizer represents a primary source of entry for perchlorate into crop systems and thus has raised widespread concern regarding food safety. Several studies have reported the occurrence of perchlorate in vegetables. However, limited information is available on the fate of perchlorate in the soil-plant system. In this study, we performed field experiments to evaluate the effects of the application rate of Chilean nitrate fertilizer and the type of fertilization (manual or fertigation) on the uptake of perchlorate by plants grown in open fields. Interestingly, in the control, chard and spinach accumulated 21.3 and 25.9 μg kg−1, respectively. For both agronomic practices, the content of perchlorate in chard and spinach increased as the fertilizer application rate increased, with fertigation promoting more significant accumulations. Spinach accumulated almost two times more perchlorate than chard for all treatments; however, the concentrations generally remained below regulatory values. The intake of spinach and chard presented a low risk to human health for all age groups. These findings enhance our understanding of the environmental impact of the use of fertilizers in agriculture and food safety. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.subjectAgronomic practices
dc.subjectChard
dc.subjectFertilizers
dc.subjectPerchlorate
dc.subjectSpinach
dc.subjectUptake
dc.subjectAgronomy
dc.subjectFertilizers
dc.subjectFood safety
dc.subjectHealth risks
dc.subjectInorganic compounds
dc.subjectRisk assessment
dc.subjectSafety engineering
dc.subjectAgronomic practices
dc.subjectChard
dc.subjectPerchlorate
dc.subjectSpinach
dc.subjectUptake
dc.subjectSoil pollution
dc.subjectfertilizer
dc.subjectperchlorate
dc.subjectperchlorate
dc.subjectagronomy
dc.subjectbioaccumulation
dc.subjectfertilizer application
dc.subjectperchlorate
dc.subjectpollution exposure
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectsource apportionment
dc.subjectvegetable
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbioaccumulation
dc.subjectbioaccumulation factor
dc.subjectcalibration
dc.subjectchard
dc.subjectclimate change
dc.subjectconcentration (parameter)
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdry weight
dc.subjectfertigation
dc.subjecthigh performance liquid chromatography
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectlimit of detection
dc.subjectlimit of quantitation
dc.subjectliquid chromatography-mass spectrometry
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectplant growth
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectsoil fertilization
dc.subjectspinach
dc.subjectvegetable consumption
dc.subjectagriculture
dc.subjectbeet
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectrisk assessment
dc.subjectsoil
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectBeta vulgaris cicla
dc.subjectSpinacia oleracea
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectBeta vulgaris
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectFertilizers
dc.subjectPerchlorates
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subjectSoil
dc.subjectSpinacia oleracea
dc.titleField study on the uptake, accumulation and risk assessment of perchlorate in a soil-chard/spinach system: Impact of agronomic practices and fertilization
dc.typeArticle


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