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dc.contributor.authorBondia-Pons I.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez J.A.
dc.contributor.authorde la Iglesia R.
dc.contributor.authorLopez-Legarrea P.
dc.contributor.authorPoutanen K.
dc.contributor.authorHanhineva K.
dc.contributor.authorZulet M.D.L.A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:13:39Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:13:39Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier10.1002/mnfr.201400309
dc.identifier.citation59, 4, 711-728
dc.identifier.issn16134125
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3826
dc.descriptionScope: Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Metabolomics approach may contribute to identify beneficial associations of metabolic changes affected by Mediterranean diet-based interventions with inflammatory and oxidative-stress markers related to the etiology and development of the MetS. Methods and results: Liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight-MS metabolic profiling was applied to plasma from a 6-month randomized intervention with two sequential periods, a 2-month nutritional-learning intervention period, and a 4-month self-control period, with two energy-restricted diets; the RESMENA diet (based on the Mediterranean dietary pattern) and the Control diet (based on the American Heart Association guidelines), in 72 subjects with a high BMI and at least two features of MetS. The major contributing biomarkers of each sequential period were lipids, mainly phospholipids and lysophospholipids. Dependency network analysis showed a different pattern of associations between metabolic changes and clinical variables after 2 and 6 month of intervention, with a highly interconnected network during the nutritional-learning intervention period of the study. Conclusion: The 2-month RESMENA diet produced significant changes in the plasma metabolic profile of subjects with MetS features. However, at the end of the 6-month study, most of the associations between metabolic and clinical variables disappeared; suggesting that adherence to healthy dietary habits had declined during the self-control period. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley-VCH Verlag
dc.subjectDependency networks
dc.subjectLC-QTOF/MS
dc.subjectMediterranean diet
dc.subjectMetabolic syndrome
dc.subjectMetabolomics
dc.subjectbiological marker
dc.subjecthigh density lipoprotein cholesterol
dc.subjectlow density lipoprotein cholesterol
dc.subjecttriacylglycerol
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectblood
dc.subjectbody mass
dc.subjectbody weight
dc.subjectCaucasian
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdiet therapy
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmass spectrometry
dc.subjectMediterranean diet
dc.subjectmetabolic syndrome X
dc.subjectmetabolome
dc.subjectmetabolomics
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial
dc.subjecttime factor
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBiomarkers
dc.subjectBody Mass Index
dc.subjectBody Weight
dc.subjectCholesterol, HDL
dc.subjectCholesterol, LDL
dc.subjectDiet, Mediterranean
dc.subjectEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMass Spectrometry
dc.subjectMetabolic Syndrome X
dc.subjectMetabolome
dc.subjectMetabolomics
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectTriglycerides
dc.titleEffects of short- and long-term Mediterranean-based dietary treatment on plasma LC-QTOF/MS metabolic profiling of subjects with metabolic syndrome features: The Metabolic Syndrome Reduction in Navarra (RESMENA) randomized controlled trial
dc.typeArticle


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