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dc.contributor.authorBurgos H.
dc.contributor.authorCofré C.
dc.contributor.authorHernández A.
dc.contributor.authorSáez-Briones P.
dc.contributor.authorAgurto R.
dc.contributor.authorCastillo A.
dc.contributor.authorMorales B.
dc.contributor.authorZeise M.L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:13:35Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:13:35Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier10.1016/j.bbr.2015.05.009
dc.identifier.citation291, , 112-117
dc.identifier.issn01664328
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3803
dc.descriptionMethylphenidate (MPH) is widely used as a "nootropic" agent and in the treatment of disorders of attention, and has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity in vitro. Here we present in vivo evidence that this MPH-induced metaplasticity can last long after the end of treatment. MPH (0, 0.2, 1 and 5. mg/kg) was administered daily to male rats from postnatal day 42 for 15 days. The animals were tested daily in a radial maze. Long-term potentiation (LTP), a marker of neural plasticity, was induced in vivo in the prefrontal cortex after 2-3. h, 15-18 days or 5 months without treatment. The behavioral performance of the 1. mg/kg group improved, while that of animals that had received 5. mg/kg deteriorated. In the 1 and 5. mg/kg groups LTP induced 2-3. h after the last MPH treatment was twice as large as in the controls. Further, 15-18 days after the last MPH administration, in groups receiving 1 and 5. mg/kg, LTP was about fourfold higher than in controls. However, 5 months later, LTP in the 1. mg/kg group was similar to controls and in the 5. mg/kg group LTP could not be induced at all. No significant changes of LTP were seen in the low-dose group of animals (0.2. mg/kg). Thus, firstly, doses of MPH that improve learning coincide approximately with those that augment LTP. Secondly, MPH-induced increases in LTP can last for several weeks, but these may disappear over longer periods or deteriorate at high doses. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectLong-term potentiation
dc.subjectMetaplasticity
dc.subjectMethylphenidate
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortex
dc.subjectmethylphenidate
dc.subjectcentral stimulant agent
dc.subjectmethylphenidate
dc.subjectnootropic agent
dc.subjectanimal experiment
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectexperimental behavioral test
dc.subjectin vivo study
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjectlong term potentiation
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmental performance
dc.subjectmetaplasticity
dc.subjectnerve cell plasticity
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectperinatal period
dc.subjectprefrontal cortex
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjectradial arm maze test
dc.subjectrat
dc.subjecttask performance
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectdose response
dc.subjectdrug effects
dc.subjectgrowth, development and aging
dc.subjectmaze test
dc.subjectmicroelectrode
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectprefrontal cortex
dc.subjectSprague Dawley rat
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCentral Nervous System Stimulants
dc.subjectDose-Response Relationship, Drug
dc.subjectLong-Term Potentiation
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMaze Learning
dc.subjectMethylphenidate
dc.subjectMicroelectrodes
dc.subjectNootropic Agents
dc.subjectPrefrontal Cortex
dc.subjectRats, Sprague-Dawley
dc.titleMethylphenidate has long-lasting metaplastic effects in the prefrontal cortex of adolescent rats
dc.typeArticle


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