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dc.contributor.authorBarcelos R.P.
dc.contributor.authorSouza M.A.
dc.contributor.authorAmaral G.P.
dc.contributor.authorStefanello S.T.
dc.contributor.authorBresciani G.
dc.contributor.authorFighera M.R.
dc.contributor.authorSoares F.A.A.
dc.contributor.authorBarbosa N.V.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:12:58Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:12:58Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier10.3390/nu6041678
dc.identifier.citation6, 4, 1678-1690
dc.identifier.issn20726643
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3677
dc.descriptionCaffeine is presented in many commercial products and has been proven to induce ergogenic effects in exercise, mainly related to redox status homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress-related adaptation mechanisms. However, most studies have mainly focused on muscle adaptations, and the role of caffeine in different tissues during exercise training has not been fully described. The aim of this study was therefore, to analyze the effects of chronic caffeine intake and exercise training on liver mitochondria functioning and plasma inflammation markers. Rats were divided into control, control/caffeine, exercise, and exercise/caffeine groups. Exercise groups underwent four weeks of swimming training and caffeine groups were supplemented with 6 mg/kg/day. Liver mitochondrial swelling and complex I activity, and plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were measured. An anti-inflammatory effect of exercise was evidenced by reduced plasma MPO activity. Additionally, caffeine intake alone and combined with exercise decreased the plasma AChE and MPO activities. The per se anti-inflammatory effect of caffeine intake should be highlighted considering its widespread use as an ergogenic aid. Therefore, caffeine seems to interfere on exercise-induced adaptations and could also be used in different exercise-related health treatments. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.subjectCaffeine
dc.subjectExercise training
dc.subjectInflammation
dc.subjectMitochondria
dc.subjectMyeloperoxidase
dc.subjectacetylcholinesterase
dc.subjectbiological marker
dc.subjectcaffeine
dc.subjectmyeloperoxidase
dc.subjectacetylcholinesterase
dc.subjectbiological marker
dc.subjectcaffeine
dc.subjectperoxidase
dc.subjectreactive oxygen metabolite
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectanimal experiment
dc.subjectanimal tissue
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectcentrifugation
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectelectric potential
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjectfood intake
dc.subjectforced swim test
dc.subjectheart muscle oxygen consumption
dc.subjectinflammation
dc.subjectliver mitochondrion
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmembrane potential
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectprotein determination
dc.subjectrat
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectblood
dc.subjectdrug effects
dc.subjectinflammation
dc.subjectoxidative stress
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectWistar rat
dc.subjectAcetylcholinesterase
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectBiological Markers
dc.subjectCaffeine
dc.subjectInflammation
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMembrane Potentials
dc.subjectMitochondria, Liver
dc.subjectOxidative Stress
dc.subjectPeroxidase
dc.subjectPhysical Conditioning, Animal
dc.subjectRats
dc.subjectRats, Wistar
dc.subjectReactive Oxygen Species
dc.titleCaffeine intake may modulate inflammation markers in trained rats
dc.typeArticle


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