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dc.contributor.authorAzua-Bustos A.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Silva C.
dc.contributor.authorCorsini G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:12:34Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:12:34Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier10.3389/fmicb.2017.00993
dc.identifier.citation8, JUN, -
dc.identifier.issn1664302X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3660
dc.descriptionThe Atacama Desert in Chile is the driest and oldest desert on Earth, also considered one of the best Mars analog models. Here, several heterotrophic microbial communities have been discovered in its driest regions, with the ones present in the soil subsurface being one of the most interesting due to its existence in a habitat with almost no water available and almost undetectable organic carbon sources. Our recent discovery of the driest site of the Atacama known to date (and the heterotrophic microbial species that are able to survive in this site) reaffirms the opportunity to better characterize the physiological and molecular mechanisms that these species use to detect, mobilize, incorporate and use carbon under these extremely harsh conditions. Here we summarize what has been reported up to date on the organic carbon concentrations in different sites of the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, proposing that due to the meager amounts of carbon and extremely dry conditions, the microbial communities of the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert may be of interest for the field of carbon science. © 2017 Azua-Bustos, González-Silva and Corsini.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.
dc.subjectAtacama Desert
dc.subjectCarbon science
dc.subjectDesert ecosystems
dc.subjectMars
dc.subjectOrganic carbon
dc.subjectcarbon
dc.subjectnitrogen
dc.subjectorganic carbon
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectBacillus
dc.subjectcarbon dynamics
dc.subjectcarbon metabolism
dc.subjectcarbon source
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectdesert
dc.subjectextreme environment
dc.subjectGeodermatophilus
dc.subjectheterotrophy
dc.subjecthypothesis
dc.subjectmass fragmentography
dc.subjectmass spectrometry
dc.subjectmicrobial community
dc.subjectmicrohabitat
dc.subjectnitrifying bacterium
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectsoil analysis
dc.subjectsoil chemistry
dc.subjectsoil microflora
dc.subjectStreptomyces
dc.subjectwind
dc.titleThe hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, an extremely dry and carbon deprived habitat of potential interest for the field of carbon science
dc.typeArticle


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