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dc.contributor.authorAlmagro P.
dc.contributor.authorHernandez C.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Cambor P.
dc.contributor.authorTresserras R.
dc.contributor.authorEscarrabill J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T22:11:07Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T22:11:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier10.2147/COPD.S75710
dc.identifier.citation10, , 899-908
dc.identifier.issn11769106
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/3530
dc.descriptionBackground: Excluding the tropics, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more frequent in winter. However, studies that directly relate hospitalizations for exacerbation of COPD to ambient temperature are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the number of hospitalizations for COPD. Methods: This was a population-based study in a metropolitan area. All hospital discharges for acute exacerbation of COPD during 2009 in Barcelona and its metropolitan area were analyzed. The relationship between the number of hospitalizations for COPD and the mean, minimum, and maximum temperatures alongside comorbidity, humidity, influenza rate, and environmental pollution were studied. Results: A total of 9,804 hospitalization discharges coded with COPD exacerbation as a primary diagnosis were included; 75.4% of cases were male with a mean age of 74.9±10.5 years and an average length of stay of 6.5±6.1 days. The highest number of admissions (3,644 [37.2%]) occurred during winter, followed by autumn with 2,367 (24.1%), spring with 2,347 (23.9%), and summer with 1,446 (14.7%; P<0.001). The maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures were associated similarly with the number of hospitalizations. On average, we found that for each degree Celsius decrease in mean weekly temperature, hospital admissions increased by 5.04% (r2=0.591; P<0.001). After adjustment for humidity, comorbidity, air pollution, and influenza-like illness, only mean temperatures retained statistical significance, with a mean increase of 4.7% in weekly admissions for each degree Celsius of temperature (r2=0.599, P<0.001). Conclusion: Mean temperatures are closely and independently related to the number of hospitalizations for COPD. © 2015 Almagro et al.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltd.
dc.subjectChronic obstructive pulmonary disease
dc.subjectHospitalization
dc.subjectHumidity
dc.subjectPollution
dc.subjectSeasonality
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectair pollution
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectautumn
dc.subjectchronic obstructive lung disease
dc.subjectcomorbidity
dc.subjectdisease exacerbation
dc.subjectenvironmental temperature
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectflu like syndrome
dc.subjecthospital discharge
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthumidity
dc.subjectlength of stay
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpopulation research
dc.subjectseasonal variation
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjectspring
dc.subjectsummer
dc.subjectwinter
dc.subjectadverse effects
dc.subjectdisease course
dc.subjectfactual database
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjecthospital admission
dc.subjectInfluenza, Human
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
dc.subjectrisk factor
dc.subjectseason
dc.subjecttemperature
dc.subjecttime factor
dc.subjectvery elderly
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectAir Pollution
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectDatabases, Factual
dc.subjectDisease Progression
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHumidity
dc.subjectInfluenza, Human
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPatient Admission
dc.subjectPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectSeasons
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjectTemperature
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectUrban Health
dc.titleSeasonality, ambient temperatures and hospitalizations for acute exacerbation of COPD: A population-based study in a metropolitan area
dc.typeArticle


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