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dc.contributor.authorPipper, Cornelia
dc.contributor.authorBliem, Linda
dc.contributor.authorLeón, Luis E.
dc.contributor.authorMennickent, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorBodner, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorGuzmán‑Gutiérrez, Enrique
dc.contributor.authorStingl, Michael
dc.contributor.authorUntersmayr, Eva
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Bernhard
dc.contributor.authorBertinat, Romina
dc.contributor.authorSepúlveda, Nuno
dc.contributor.authorWestermeier, Francisco
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T07:25:10Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T07:25:10Z
dc.date.issued2024
dc.identifier10.1007/s40618-024-02334-1
dc.identifier.issn03914097
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/11287
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating disease characterized by persistent fatigue and decreased daily activity following physical and/or cognitive exertion. While ME/CFS affects both sexes, there is a higher prevalence in women. However, studies evaluating this sex-related bias are limited. Methods: Circulating steroid hormones, including mineralocorticoids (aldosterone), glucocorticoids (cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, cortisone), androgens (androstenedione, testosterone), and progestins (progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone), were measured in plasma samples using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS). Samples were obtained from mild/moderate (ME/CFSmm; females, n=20; males, n=8), severely affected patients (ME/CFSsa; females, n=24; males, n=6), and healthy controls (HC, females, n=12; males, n=17). Results: After correction for multiple testing, we observed that circulating levels of 11-deoxycortisol, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone in females, and progesterone in males were significantly different between HC, ME/CFSmm, and ME/CFSsa. Comparing two independent groups, we found that female ME/CFSsa had higher levels of 11-deoxycortisol (vs. HC and ME/CFSmm) and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (vs. HC). In addition, female ME/CFSmm showed a significant increase in progesterone levels compared to HC. In contrast, our study found that male ME/CFSmm had lower circulating levels of cortisol and corticosterone, while progesterone levels were elevated compared to HC. In addition to these univariate analyses, our correlational and multivariate approaches identified differential associations between our study groups. Also, using two-component partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), we were able to discriminate ME/CFS from HC with an accuracy of 0.712 and 0.846 for females and males, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings suggest the potential value of including steroid hormones in future studies aimed at improving stratification in ME/CFS. Additionally, our results provide new perspectives to explore the clinical relevance of these differences within specific patient subgroups. Graphical abstract: (Figure presented.) © The Author(s) 2024.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFH JOANNEUM University of Applied Sciences; Universidad de Concepción, UdeC; UCL-RFH BioBank; Österreichische Gesellschaft für ME; Chicken Farmers of Saskatchewan, CFS; ME Research UK, (SC036942); Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, FCT, (UIDB/00006/2020); Agencia Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo, ANID, (PFCHA-21190736); Ministerio de Educación, Gobierno de Chile, MINEDUC, (UCO 1866)es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbHes_ES
dc.subjectMyalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndromees_ES
dc.subjectSex-related differenceses_ES
dc.subjectSteroid hormoneses_ES
dc.titleSex and disease severity-based analysis of steroid hormones in ME/CFSes_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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