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dc.contributor.authorConcha-Cisternas, Yeny
dc.contributor.authorCastro-Piñero, José
dc.contributor.authorVásquez, Jaime
dc.contributor.authorMartorell, Miquel
dc.contributor.authorCigarroa, Igor
dc.contributor.authorPetermann-Rocha, Fanny
dc.contributor.authorParra-Soto, Solange
dc.contributor.authorPoblete, Felipe
dc.contributor.authorMatus-Castillo, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorGarrrido-Méndez, Álex
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Sanguinetti, María Adela
dc.contributor.authorNazar, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorLeiva-Ordoñez, Ana María
dc.contributor.authorTroncoso-Pantoja, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorDiaz-Martínez, Ximena
dc.contributor.authorCelis-Morales, Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-10T06:34:33Z
dc.date.available2024-04-10T06:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier10.14482/sun.38.3.155.67
dc.identifier.issn01205552
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/11020
dc.description.abstractBackground: Walking pace could be considered an early risk marker of cognitive impairment in older people. Objective: To determine the association between walking pace and cognitive impairment in older Chilean adults. Methods: 1,788 adults older than 60 years from the 2016-2017 Chilean National Health Survey with data available in the exposure and outcome were included in this cross-sectio-nal study. Walking pace was self-reported and categorised as slow, average and brisk. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Abbreviated Mini-Mental questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between walking pace and cognitive impairment, logistic regression analyses – adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle and health-related covariates. Results: In the minimally adjusted model and compared to older adults who self-reported a brisk walking pace, those in the slow walking pace category were 2.67 times more likely to have cognitive impairment (OR: 2.67 [95% CI: 1.62, 4.42]). When the analyses were adjus-ted, the association was attenuated but remained significant (OR: 1.78 [95% CI: 1.15 3.17]). No associations were found between average pace walkers and cognitive impairment. Conclusion: Older adults who self-reported a slow walking pace having a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment than their counterparts who had a brisk walking pace. Considering that cognitive impairment is a geriatric syndrome with a high prevalence in the elderly, the-re is a need to emphasise strategies for an early diagnosis. Therefore, walking pace may be a useful marker to identify individuals at high risk of cognitive impairment. © 2022, Universidad del Norte. All rights reserved.es_ES
dc.language.isoeses_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad del Nortees_ES
dc.subjectcognitive impairmentes_ES
dc.subjectelderlyes_ES
dc.subjectgaites_ES
dc.subjectphysical activityes_ES
dc.subjectwalking pacees_ES
dc.titleWalking pace and cognitive impairment in elderly: finding from the Chilean National Health Survey 2016-2017es_ES
dc.title.alternativeAsociación entre velocidad de marcha y deterioro cognitivo en personas mayores: resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud 2016-2017es_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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