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dc.contributor.authorMaimone, Naydja Moralles
dc.contributor.authorJunior, Mario Cezar Pozza
dc.contributor.authorde Oliveira, Lucianne Ferreira Paes
dc.contributor.authorRojas-Villalta, Dorian
dc.contributor.authorde Lira, Simone Possedente
dc.contributor.authorBarrientos, Leticia
dc.contributor.authorNúñez-Montero, Kattia
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-10T01:22:53Z
dc.date.available2024-04-10T01:22:53Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier10.3389/fmicb.2023.1187321
dc.identifier.issn1664302X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/10588
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Phytopathogenic fungi are a considerable concern for agriculture, as they can threaten the productivity of several crops worldwide. Meanwhile, natural microbial products are acknowledged to play an important role in modern agriculture as they comprehend a safer alternative to synthetic pesticides. Bacterial strains from underexplored environments are a promising source of bioactive metabolites. Methods: We applied the OSMAC (One Strain, Many Compounds) cultivation approach, in vitro bioassays, and metabolo-genomics analyses to investigate the biochemical potential of Pseudomonas sp. So3.2b, a strain isolated from Antarctica. Crude extracts from OSMAC were analyzed through HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS, molecular networking, and annotation. The antifungal potential of the extracts was confirmed against Rhizoctonia solani strains. Moreover, the whole-genome sequence was studied for biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) identification and phylogenetic comparison. Results and Discussion: Molecular networking revealed that metabolite synthesis has growth media specificity, and it was reflected in bioassays results against R. solani. Bananamides, rhamnolipids, and butenolides-like molecules were annotated from the metabolome, and chemical novelty was also suggested by several unidentified compounds. Additionally, genome mining confirmed a wide variety of BGCs present in this strain, with low to no similarity with known molecules. An NRPS-encoding BGC was identified as responsible for producing the banamides-like molecules, while phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a close relationship with other rhizosphere bacteria. Therefore, by combining -omics approaches and in vitro bioassays, our study demonstrates that Pseudomonas sp. So3.2b has potential application to agriculture as a source of bioactive metabolites. Copyright © 2023 Maimone, Junior, de Oliveira, Rojas-Villalta, de Lira, Barrientos and Núñez-Montero.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFONDECYT-1210563, (11230475); Network for Extreme Environments Research, (NXR17-0003); São Paulo State Funding Agency, Brazil; Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo, FAPESP, (2019/17721-9, 2022/01529-4); Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, CAPES; Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, CONICYT; Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, CNPq, (141501/2020-0, 142260/2020-4); Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, ITCR, (5402-1510-1035); Institut chilien de l'Antarctique, INACH; Agencia Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo, ANIDes_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.es_ES
dc.subjectbioactivityes_ES
dc.subjectbioprospectinges_ES
dc.subjectbiosynthetic gene clusteres_ES
dc.subjectgenomicses_ES
dc.subjectmolecular networkinges_ES
dc.subjectOSMACes_ES
dc.subjectsecondary metaboliteses_ES
dc.titleMetabologenomics analysis of Pseudomonas sp. So3.2b, an Antarctic strain with bioactivity against Rhizoctonia solanies_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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