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dc.contributor.authorToro-Ascuy, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorCárdenas, Juan P.
dc.contributor.authorZorondo-Rodríguez, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Damariz
dc.contributor.authorSilva-Moreno, Evelyn
dc.contributor.authorPuebla, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorNunez-Parra, Alexia
dc.contributor.authorReyes-Cerpa, Sebastián
dc.contributor.authorFuenzalida, Loreto F.
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-10T00:28:39Z
dc.date.available2024-04-10T00:28:39Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier10.3390/microorganisms11071635
dc.identifier.issn20762607
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12728/10457
dc.description.abstractBackground: The respiratory microbiome is dynamic, varying between anatomical niches, and it is affected by various host and environmental factors, one of which is lifestyle. Few studies have characterized the upper respiratory tract microbiome profile according to lifestyle. We explored the association between lifestyles and microbiota profiles in the upper respiratory tract of healthy adults. Methods: We analyzed nasal samples from 110 healthy adults who were living in Santiago, Chile, using 16S ribosomal RNA gene-sequencing methods. Volunteers completed a structured questionnaire about lifestyle. Results: The composition and abundance of taxonomic groups varied across lifestyle attributes. Additionally, multivariate models suggested that alpha diversity varied in the function of physical activity, nutritional status, smoking, and the interaction between nutritional status and smoking, although the significant impact of those variables varied between women and men. Although physical activity and nutritional status were significantly associated with all indexes of alpha diversity among women, the diversity of microbiota among men was associated with smoking and the interaction between nutritional status and smoking. Conclusions: The alpha diversity of nasal microbiota is associated with lifestyle attributes, but these associations depend on sex and nutritional status. Our results suggest that future studies of the airway microbiome may provide a better resolution if data are stratified for differences in sex and nutritional status. © 2023 by the authors.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipANID FONDECYT, (11200209, 1230750, 1230809); Vicerrectoría de Investigación y Postgrado, Universidad Autónoma de Chile 2017es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)es_ES
dc.subjecthealthy adultses_ES
dc.subjectmicrobiota profilees_ES
dc.subjectnosees_ES
dc.subjectnutritional statuses_ES
dc.subjectsexes_ES
dc.subjectupper respiratory tractes_ES
dc.titleMicrobiota Profile of the Nasal Cavity According to Lifestyles in Healthy Adults in Santiago, Chilees_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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